SoloShot Vs. Swivl Review

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Ever want to video your ride and find yourself missing a cameraman? Look no further, as tracking cameras are taking over the video camera market!  This is about soloshot vs swivl comparison. Equestrians across the globe are investing in tracking cameras that record their rides without the use of a cameraman. 

Some major players in the tracking camera industry are SoloShot and Swivl.  While created with vastly different intentions, both companies are producing tracking cameras that could be used by equestrians.  

In this article, I will be discussing these cameras and how they could be used by equestrians all over the world.  I will discuss the benefits of using tracking cameras for riding and will be analyzing the uses, features, pros, and cons of SoloShot and Swivl.

Soloshot vs Swivl: Tracking Cameras and Riding

“Will you video my course?” I find myself saying this phrase all the time at the barn and at horse shows! I always feel horrible asking; someone has to direct their attention away from their lesson or from their job in order to take a video of me jumping.

With tracking cameras, this will no longer be a problem! Tracking cameras sit on a tripod by themselves.  By using systems of sensors (each unique to the specific camera), the tracking camera is able to follow its target as it moves.

Soloshot vs Swivl: Tracking Cameras and Riding

Tracking cameras have been used by athletes in all realms of sports; surfers, motorcyclists, and of course, equestrians.  They allow us to analyze and share our rides, even when we are riding on our own, or do not have someone who is able to “video our course.”

Soloshot vs Swivl: SoloShot

The SoloShot is the tracking camera most commonly used by equestrians.  Right now, SoloShot is on its third generation, SoloShot3.  They offer a few different packages so that customers can select what is the best fit for them.

Intended Purpose

The SoloShot company designs their cameras and camera systems with athletes in mind.  Athletes are featured in the photographs and review on their website. As discussed in a form on the Chronicle of the Horse, SoloShot is the predominant tracking camera used by equestrians today.

Soloshot vs Swivl: Features

There are a few different features that set the SoloShot apart from other tracking cameras.  The subject of the SoloShot’s video wears a tracker on a wristband or armband. This tracker indicates to the camera where the subject is and allows the camera to track it.

The SoloShot3 comes in two different variations; the SoloShot3 with the Optic25 Camera and the SoloShot3 with the Optic65 Camera.  Both can be purchased either new or “refurbished.” The Optic25 camera runs $678 refurbished and $778 new. Both packages include the SoloShot Tripod Lite as well.

The Optic25 camera will shoot a target within 600 ft of the camera and takes 1080p60 video.  It can Livestream the video and has a 25x optical zoom. Unfortunately, though, it can only be used outside.

The Optic65 camera will shoot a target beyond 600 ft of the camera and takes high-quality 4k video.  It can also live-stream the video and has 65x optical zoom (hence the names, Optic25 and Optic65). The Optic65 can also only be used outside.

Soloshot vs Swivl: Pros and Cons for Equestrians

The pros and cons of the SoloShot for equestrians are fairly clear.  The range of the Optic65 is sufficient enough for all large arenas. The range of the Optic25 would be sufficient for small arenas and round pen or lounge work. Range is a huge pro of using the SoloShot.

The high-quality video and the large optic zooms are also benefits for equestrians.  Large zoom will enable riders to better critique their positions, and high-quality video is always preferable for video sharing.

The only cons of the Soloshot are its price and its outdoor limitations.  The price isn’t too surprising, given the price points of other tracking cameras and high-quality cameras in general.  But, it will still put the SoloShot out of some equestrians price ranges.  

Soloshot vs Swivl: Pros and Cons for Equestrians

The outdoor limitation is the biggest con for equestrians.  Most equestrians are forced to ride inside a few months of the year due to weather.  For example, I come from a state that requires us to ride inside four months of the year, if not more.  These four months are still crucial to my training, and I would want a camera that could record these rides as well.  

SoloShot has stated that they will be coming out with an indoor-shoot adaptation soon, but it has not been released yet.  As such, the outdoor limitations are still a large con in deciding whether to purchase a SoloShot or not.

Swivl

The Swivl is another large player in the tracking camera industry.  While the Swivl may have a different variety of features and characteristics than the SoloShot, the end goal is the same; to capture a moving target without the use of a live cameraman.

Soloshot vs Swivl: Intended Purpose

The Swivl was intended for professional use; teachers and presenters use Swivl to record lectures, speeches, panels, and presentations.  All of the representations (images, testimonials, etc.) on Swivl’s website are from individuals in these professions.

Features

The most interesting feature of the Swivl is that it isn’t actually a camera; it’s a camera base and is compatible with an iPhone or an iPad.  The base itself tracks the moving object while recording with whatever device is connected to it. The subject of the camera wears a tracker, typically on a lanyard, and the camera base follows the subject’s motion.  

The Swivl has a range of 32 feet and can be used both inside and outside.  It was designed to be used inside, but, since it uses iPhone and iPad technology for the video itself, it can be used wherever an iPhone or iPad can be used.

Pros and Cons for Equestrians

The biggest con for equestrians using the Swivl is its range.  32 ft is enough to capture a large circle, and that’s about it; the Swivl would not be able to capture a full course, which, for me, would take it out of my consideration set.  

It is also very expensive, but about the same as the SoloShot. The Swivl begins pricing at $599.  Some have recommended setting up several Swivl cameras to combat the small range, but then the price would jump to around $1200 for two cameras, which could cover 64 ft.

Pros and Cons for Equestrians

Conclusion

Tracking cameras are changing the name of the game for videography in the equestrian world! Both SoloShot and Swivl have systems that can create footage for riders without the use of a cameraman.  All equestrians love to watch videos of their rides and their lessons, for both training and sharing purposes. It will be a joy to watch where this industry goes in the future! Please share this article and share your experiences using tracking cameras with us!


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